Program Standards

Program Response to the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential Program Standards Contra Costa County Office of Education
The column on the left presents the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential program standards separated into small sections. In the center column we have provided our response to the standard section, describing how Contra Costa County Office of Education's program design will be aligned to the standard in that section. In the far right column we have provided supportive documentation, including hyperlinks.
Program Standard Language Description of Alignment to Program Standard Evidence
Category 1 - Program Design and Coordination
Program Standard One: Program Design and Rationale
The administrative services preparation program prepares instructional leaders to serve effectively in a variety of public schools and school districts.
The design of the program is based on a sound rationale informed by theory and research and aligned with the California Administrator Performance Expectations and principles of adult learning theory. The design of the program is based on a sound rationale informed by theory and research and aligned with the California Administrator Performance Expectations and principles of adult learning theory. Contra Costa County Office of Education's Preliminary Administrative Services Credential Program has been designed to align with the California Administrative Performance Expectation Standards, CAPEs. Our program takes participants through a study from theory and research to practical application, in a "developmentally progressive experience" that is based on adult learning theory. Through participation in activities that assist staff (and participants) in understanding the knowledge, skills, and experiences that participants bring with them to the program, faculty offers a differentiated approach that "meets people where they are", coaching within their Zone of Proximal Development. Taking this theory into practice, faculty members adapt instruction and activities with the understanding that participants come to the program on a continuum of skills. Participant engage in scenario-based activities where they can practice problem solving in a safe environment. Additionally, participation in practical experiences throughout the program, such as field work experiences, shadowing, etc., are tailored to the interests and needs of participants, and provided the choice that adult learners thrive on. Through their work on the CalAPA, participants research and practice within the context of their work environment and set goals that are individualized. Program designers drew content from research and theory around the focal areas of our mission, which is centered on leadership for social justice. Our overarching concepts of systems thinking, improvement science, inquiry, relationship building, grounded in culturally relevant pedagogy are woven into each aspect of the program. Program designers researched the work of successful administrator preparation programs throughout the nation to develop a program that is rigorous, relevant, and purposeful in its commitment to equitable, inclusive outcomes for all students. The structure of the program has been crafted to engage adult learners in a supportive environment conducive to working professionals. The blended program of online and in-person coursework and fieldwork experiences prepares leaders for the diverse challenges facing schools in the 21st Century. Throughout each course, candidates participate in experiences that encompass the knowledge and skills needed to successfully and ethically lead, grounded in the CAPEs. Program details are presented at the program's orientation, where candidates are given a thorough background of our program's mission and how each CAPE-aligned course builds upon the concepts and theories centered around deepening an understanding of practices and policies that impact student learning. Description of Research Based Vision
Description of Research Based Vision-TIP
CAPE Course Alignment
The program includes a coherent, developmental, integrated, and interrelated set of theoretical and practical learning experiences designed to provide extensive opportunities to engage candidates in developing knowledge, skills, and dispositions to advance teaching and learning. Each of our CAPE-aligned courses builds upon the concepts and theories that deepen an understanding of practices and policies impacting student learning. Our overarching concepts of systems-thinking, improvement science, inquiry, relationship building, grounded in culturally relevant pedagogy are woven into each aspect of the program. To support achieving program outcomes, our candidates will complete these seven courses; developing the leadership competencies of shared vision for equitable and inclusive outcomes (CAPEs 1,5,6), instructional leadership (CAPE 2,5,6), continuous improvement(CAPEs 1-6), organizational leadership and systems thinking (CAPE 3,5,6), community relationships (CAPE 4,5,6), and ethical leadership for justice(CAPEs 1,5,6). Our five core texts are utilized in each course, and readings and activities from these books are integrated with articles, blogs, and other media to support candidates' development of the knowledge and skills needed to improve teaching and learning. Our five texts are: *Excellence Through Equity: Five Principles of Courageous Leadership to Guide Achievement for Every Student by Alan Blankstein & Pedro Noguera
*Learning by Doing, by Richard DuFour, Rebecca DuFour, Robert Baker, Thomas Many, Mike Mattos
*The Principal; by Michael Fullan
*The Leadership Challenge; Sixth Edition; By James Kouzes and Barry Posner
*Rethinking Teacher Supervision and Evaluation: How to Work Smart, Build Collaboration, and Close the Achievement Gap; Second Edition; by Kim Marshall. Throughout the program, our candidates develop a belief system around issues of justice through coursework that is grounded in the tenets of Kouzes and Posner’s Five Practices of Exemplary Leadership. This leadership model challenges leaders to creatively contribute to our future through inspirational leadership practices and the development of professional competence. Candidates will not only become proficient around the practices of Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) through activities and readings from DuFour's work, Learning By Doing, but will also engage in PLC work within the program. Through a deep understanding of improvement science, our candidates will utilize strategies such as design thinking to tackle the complex challenges our educational systems face. Our courses' curricula is integrated so that candidates understand the theoretical background around best practices for creating equitable outcomes, and are then able to apply this knowledge and skills in practical activities during course sessions, online PLC's, and fieldwork activities.
Our program outcomes are as follows: *Graduates will be able to develop and implement a shared vision of learning that is grounded in a cycle of continuous improvement. *Graduates will be able to shape a collaborative culture of teaching and learning for both students and adult learners that focuses on equitable and inclusive student outcomes and educator professional growth.
*Graduates will be able to inspire and lead through well honed interpersonal skills, reflective practices, and the development of a belief system around issues of justice.
*Graduates will be able to effectively manage a safe, productive, learning organization for equitable, inclusive outcomes through the use of a systems thinking lens.
*Graduates will be able to build positive relationships with families and communities to understand their needs in order to ensure the transformation of educational systems to support each and every student.
*Graduates will be able to successfully and ethically lead, influencing the political and cultural landscape of the 21st Century around practices and policies that impact student learning.
*Graduates will be able to use a variety of strategies to successfully tackle the complex challenges faced by schools today.
Program faculty are all experienced leaders who bring a balanced approach of learning opportunities that are based on adult learning theory and practical application of effective practices and policies that impact student learning. All faculty meet at least three times a year and participate in common training to ensure that our candidates receive instruction that has continuity and is grounded in our mission. Course syllabi were developed by members of the CCCOE Educational Services Division, including the Senior Director, Program Coordinator, Director 1, and also developed by local leaders within Contra Costa County, including a Special Education Director, Assistant Superintendent, and a recently retired Executive Director. Each course has outcomes based on the CAPEs, the PASC program mission, and the program outcomes to maintain consistency and build upon the knowledge and skills acquired in previous courses. Our program model provides 180 hours of in person Instruction, (18 Saturdays/7.5 hours per session; 24 hours of our intensive Leadership Learning Seminar (4 days/6 hours per day) , 72 hours of online learning between Saturday sessions, fieldwork opportunities that focus on equity driven leadership experiences, and mentoring and advisory work with faculty members.
PASC Program Handbook
Program Courses Overview             Course Syllabi - evidence of Program texts, course activities and Signature Projects
EDA 631
EDA 632
EDA 633
EDA 634
EDA 635
EDA 636
EDA 637
The program includes both formative and summative assessments based on the California Administrator Performance Expectations (CAPE). Throughout the 11 month program, formative assessments are used to support participants’ growth as they make their way towards proficiency, based on the program outcomes and CAPEs. During each course, individual and collaborative activities, projects, presentations, and writing activities assist faculty in monitoring and determining participants’ understanding of essential knowledge and skills. At the end of each course students are required to complete a Signature Project in which they demonstrate understanding of the identified essential standards, CAPEs, and corresponding performance expectations of the course. Faculty members review and grade each Signature Project associated with the course they teach, ensuring satisfactory understanding of the knowledge and skills necessary to meet the accompanying performance expectations. Each Signature Project provides an opportunity for feedback and growth. All Signature Projects will be uploaded into CANVAS as a part of the End of Program Portfolio, used as a summative assessment, shared at the Leadership Symposium . Participants will not be considered for program completion until all Signature Projects are accounted for in the participant’s End of Program Portfolio.
PASC Program Handbook - Grading

PASC End of Program Portfolio

CCCOE PASC Graphic Depiction of Assessment Timeline

Fieldwork Experience Log
Program Overview -

PASC End of Program Portfolio

End of Program Requirements
Course Syllabi with Signature Projects
EDA 631
EDA 632
EDA 633
EDA 634
EDA 635
EDA 636
EDA 637
Program Standard Two: Collaboration, Communication, and Coordination
Each sponsor of an administrative services preparation program establishes one or more partnerships that contribute substantively to the design, implementation, quality and effectiveness of the program. The Contra Costa County Office of Education's PASC program has partnered with National University to provide an optional masters program for our candidates. National University has also provided guidance on the development of our program, and continues to provide feedback and input around our program's quality and effectiveness. Through CCCOE's PASC Program participation in National University's Applied School Leadership Program, program leaders collaborate quarterly with other county office preliminary program leaders across the state, sharing ideas and practices around curricula, program structures, assessment, and Commission requirements. National University offers our participants the opportunity to earn their Master's Degree; therefore, we work closely with National to support participants in our PASC program. National University leaders are invited to faculty meetings, orientations, End of Program Leadership Symposium, and Leadership Learning Seminar. Our partnership with National University includes advisement in the development of our courses for both the year 1 PASC program and the optional year 2 Master's courses. Additionally we collaborate in the selection of instructors for the year 2 Master's Program, review participants' progress towards completion of our program on an ongoing basis, and partner in the review of each thesis to ensure successful submissions. Our participation in CTC's Quarterly PASC Coordinator Meetings allows our PASC program leadership the opportunity to interface with other PASC program leaders across the state, including leaders from National University. Initial bi-monthly meetings with National help us to ensure that we have a common mission and goal in terms of the quality and effectiveness of the CCCOE PASC program. Continuous improvement is at the core of the work we do throughout the Contra Costa County Office of Education. At the end of each course, participants are asked to complete a survey, assisting us in our data collection around program quality and effectiveness. End of program surveys are provided to all participants, as well. Faculty review data which includes end of program portfolios, program and course surveys, and faculty feedback, in order to monitor and adjust program components for optimum effectiveness. Survey data is shared with National University, as well. Additionally, The PASC Leadership Team meets throughout the year with members of the PASC Program faculty to review program design and course syllabi and to provide feedback on program quality and effectiveness. Our program is overseen by members of the PASC Leadership Team, who are overseen by the PASC Advisory Team. The PASC Advisory Team is made up of senior leaders within the Contra Costa County Office of Education as well as leaders throughout Contra Costa County, bringing a wide range of experiences, perspectives, and expertise. The PASC Advisory Team is overseen by the CCCOE Superintendent of Schools. Our oversight teams provide support around program design and implementation of program components and are critical partners around the quality and effectiveness of the program. The PASC Program Coordinator meets regularly with the Senior Director of Educational Services, who also sits on the Superintendent's Cabinet. Throughout the year the PASC program is an ongoing agenda item that is discussed in the Superintendent's Cabinet. Reports and updates are given to CCCOE Board members at public board meetings, as well. CCCOE PASC Handbook
Letter of Assurance
as evidence of partnership with National University
CCCOE Ed Services Organizational Chart- Evidence of partnership with National University
CCCOE PASC End of Program Survey Sample
CCCOE PASC Annotated List of Data Sources
CCCOE PASC Graphic Depiction of Assessment Timeline
CCCOE PASC Assessment Cycle Roles and Responsibilities
PASC Leadership Team
PASC Advisory Team
Partnership agreements are collaboratively established with each partner and clearly define roles and expectations of all partners sharing the responsibility for the implementation and success of the program. Contra Costa County Office of Education serves 18 local school districts and the Community College District in Contra Costa County. Each district partners with the CCCOE and provides information to its staff members, encouraging future leaders to participate in the PASC program. Informational meetings are held for candidate recruitment, as well as for district leaders throughout Contra Costa County. Candidates partner with local school district leaders through their participation in course activities such as: shadowing and/or interviewing leaders (Course 633); observing local school board and community meetings (Course 633); participating in district professional development (Course 637); participating in site and/or district committees (Course 637) . School district personnel work with candidates to support Fieldwork experiences, as well as completion of course assignments. National University has also partnered with the CCCOE PASC program to provide a second year Master's program, as well as the opportunity for participants to earn units while participating in our PASC program. The close collaboration between National University and the CCCOE PASC program is crucial in supporting participants earning units and/or a masters degree. Not only do our program leaders meet with National University colleagues bi-monthly to ensure ongoing monitoring of program quality, but we also work closely to monitor participants' successful completion of all components of the program. National University and CCCOE PASC leaders work together to select instructors for the program, review course content for effectiveness, review evidence of students' classwork and Signature Project completion, and review survey data at the end of each course and at the conclusion of the program. Therefore, CCCOE and National University's partnership includes assistance in program design, assessment, and through analysis of feedback regarding program effectiveness. Letter of Assurance

EDA 633Syllabus

EDA 637 Syllabus


Fieldwork Experience Roles and Responsibilities

Candidate Recruitment and Program Completion
Monitoring


Sample CCCOE Dateline. January 2020 Communications

Site/District Fieldwork
Supervisor Responsibilities


Faculty Advisor Responsibilities
Partners, such as advisory committees, school districts that facilitate field experiences, higher education institutions, community organizations, and other stakeholder groups establish productive working relationships, coordinate joint efforts, and communicate regularly and openly. Our partnerships with local school districts, National University, other county sponsored preliminary administrative services credential programs. and community stakeholder groups are crucial to the success of the PASC program. Our PASC Leadership Team draws from organizations across our county, and includes current leaders, community members from various organizations, and retired leaders who are willing to partner around our mission. Our PASC Advisory Team is made up of PASC faculty advisors who work directly with school district leaders and National University faculty throughout the 11-month program to support candidate participation in fieldwork, as well as successful completion of course activities. Open and regular communication is crucial to the successful support of our candidates. Initial meetings occur with PASC leaders and National University leaders. PASC leadership participates in CTC's Quarterly PASC meetings to collaborate and communicate regularly with other PASC partners across the state. School site and district leaders partner with CCCOE to foster leadership from within their organizations. District and site leaders are encouraged to attend our informational meetings each year, however PASC faculty is always willing to go to school sites or district offices and provide more local informational opportunities, as well. National University Faculty participates in all recruitment meetings, providing information on how participants can earn units, earn their Master's Degree, and provide information on financial aid. Partner feedback is solicited to assess program quality and effectiveness. At least once a year local leaders from throughout Contra Costa County are invited to provide feedback through electronic communications. Additionally, feedback is shared with our partners at National University. PASC Stakeholder Involvement, Program Plan,Timeline At A Glance showing recruitment partnerships 

Fieldwork Experience Roles and Responsibilities -
evidence of district partnerships
Applied School Leadership Program - website showing partnerships with county offices of education CCCOE Communications CCCOE
PASC End of Program Survey Sample - evidence of ongoing feedback from partners Partnership Responsibilities
Partners share responsibility for program quality; candidate recruitment, selection, and advisement; curriculum development; delivery of instruction; selection of field sites; design of field experiences; selection and preparation of field experience supervisors, and assessment and verification of candidate competence. Our collaboration with program partners is invaluable. Throughout the development of our program we have relied on the input and feedback from local leaders throughout our county. Additionally we have sought out the expertise of other PASC program leaders across the state, CTC experts, as well as our partners from National University. This ongoing support and collaboration is highly impactful in all aspects of our program, including but not limited to the design and content of our program in terms of the competence and preparedness of our graduates. Feedback that is garnered through surveys, annual meetings, and through face to face communications with partners is welcomed and solicited in order for us to participate in our own cycle of continuous improvement. Collaboration with site and district leaders supporting candidates throughout their fieldwork and course studies is important in terms of ensuring that candidates are mentored by effective leaders. This 360 degree view gives program leadership the robust perspective needed to ensure that every aspect of our program is of the highest quality. Our practices around the recruitment, selection, and advisement of candidates is an additional area of feedback solicited and analyzed through our community partnerships. All data received is reviewed and shared with National University leaders and other county and district partners, as appropriate. Focus Meeting Charts - Chart 1, Chart 2, Chart 3 - Sample feedback from local leaders

CCCOE PASC Graphic Depiction of Assessment Timeline- Showing site/district collaboration
Stakeholder Involvment Program Plan - Showing Faculty Meetings and Topics
Fieldwork Experience Roles and Responsibilities

Program Standard Three: Development of Professional Leadership Perspectives

By design, the administrative services preparation program facilitates each candidate’s development of a professional leadership perspective through learning activities that promote leadership and interpersonal skills.
The program curriculum and pedagogies are designed to engage candidates in learning activities that require the ability to diagnose the causes of organizational problems at both macro and micro-organizational levels (e.g., system-wide and individual). Contra Costa County Office of Education's PASC program is designed to help candidates gain experiences that provide practical application of the CAPEs, as well as engage in theoretical study that deepens their abilities to effectively serve as educational leaders. Our curriculum is developed in a sequence where course content and experiences build upon one another. Each course embeds activities that help candidates to make meaning through inquiry and reflection, designed around adult learning theory. Each course includes virtual experiences within a professional learning community model, in-person collaborative activities based on the course content, and participation in inquiry and reflective activities to deepen each candidates personal belief system around issues of equity. Our five textbooks are utilized during each course, ensuring that the elements of our program's mission are a common thread within each learning opportunity. Each course has a culminating activity, the Signature Project, that allows students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills around organizational effectiveness that supports the needs of all students. Throughout the program, candidates become proficient in analyzing multiple data sources, deepening their understanding of the importance of the critical diagnosis of program strengths and needs in vision and goal development for social justice. Candidates learn to utilize a cycle of improvement, looking at the strengths and needs of systems. During Course 631, Developing and Implementing a Shared Vision, candidates have opportunities to work through cycles of inquiry, actively engaging in the plan, do, reflect/study, act processes that are required to continuously improve teaching and learning and school goal outcomes. Candidates will understand how to develop systems and utilize critical inquiry practices that engage stakeholders in gathering, analyzing, and sharing data that assesses and monitors program effectiveness. Course 632, Instructional Leadership, will deepen candidates' understanding of the role of instructional leader through collaborative and supportive practices that focus on relationships and critical conversations that address organizational issues. Candidates will be able to use the state-adopted standards and frameworks to guide, support, and monitor teaching and learning for equitable and inclusive outcomes. Course 633, Organizational and Systems Leadership, helps candidates continue to gather and analyze data so they can identify site and student needs and learn how to effectively align fiscal, human, and technological resources to support student safety, learning, and well-being. During this course candidates will deepen their understanding of practices that perpetuate systemic biases and practices that address inequity and discriminatory practice, both at a macro and micro level. During Course 634, Family and Community Engagement, candidates will engage in activities to deepen their understanding of educational law and policy, and its impact on students, staff and community. Throughout the course, candidates learn best practices for engaging families and communities and for developing systems and practices of critical inquiry to reflect upon and engage staff and stakeholders around the assessment of inclusive, equitable programs and instructional practices. Course 635 focuses on Professional and Personal Ethics for leadership, and candidates participate in personal reflection activities centered around practices that break down institutional barriers and achieve equitable and inclusive outcomes for all students. During this course, candidates engage in study that increases their awareness of how educational law has been impacted by historical trends and issues that have then impacted equitable and inclusive outcomes for all students, including policies affecting special education students and students in underrepresented student groups. Course 636, Leadership Perspectives: External Context and Policy, deepens this work through additional study of educational policy and law. Candidates participate in activities that analyze the affects of such policies and practices in all parts of the educational system that are influenced by political, social, economic, legal and cultural factors. Finally, through our fieldwork course, Course 637, Equity Driven Educational Opportunities, candidates participate in field experiences in an educational setting that are tied directly to some aspect of social justice in order to apply their knowledge and skills around practices promoting equity within our communities. Candidates learn to analyze and diagnose systemic issues both from a local level through their fieldwork experiences, as well as deepen their understanding of the "bigger picture" perspectives through learning experiences . Course Syllabi -
EDA 631
EDA 632
EDA 633
EDA 634
EDA 635
EDA 636 
EDA 637

Evidence of activities diagnosing organizational problems
The program provides multiple opportunities for candidates to apply skills of reasoned and objective inquiry to analyze complex problems and propose effective solutions considering the political context and its implications. Critical inquiry is at the core of our program's design. Through cycles of inquiry around educational issues, our candidates develop skills that allow them to think critically and tackle complex problems using a systems-thinking lens. In Course 631 and then again in 633, candidates explore Michael Fullan's work around becoming a "District and Systems Player", using data analysis and critical inquiry to then partner within the system for change. In this same course, candidates become proficient in their understanding and analysis of the multiple types of data that provide perspectives around students outcomes. Demographic and assessment data are analyzed in various ways throughout our program, helping students to understand the impact of cultural, political and social contexts impacting a just system. Through activity based experiences, candidates study and utilize the practices of improvement science within each course, by participating in cycles of improvement not only around the problem of practice identified in Course 631, but also as a supervisor of teaching and learning in Course 632, and as a member of a larger organization during "systems unpacking" in Course 633. Each course has students connect their own experiences to create contextual understanding through interviews, shadowing, and job-embedded practical leadership experiences. Course Syllabi -
EDA 631
EDA 632
EDA 633
In addition, the program ensures candidates understand environmental contexts, organizational culture, intra-organizational systems, and their influence on human behavior and educational outcomes. The leadership behaviors and concepts from James Kouzes and Barry Posner's book, The Leadership Challenge, are woven throughout each course and provide a study of the behavioral and cultural impacts on student learning. Candidates deepen their own reflection on their emotional intelligence through activities and learning opportunities focused on relationship and trust building, such as the Emotionally Intelligent Principals article in Course 635. Our program embeds the cross alignment of cultural proficiency and leadership. Candidates utilize DuFour's book, Learning by Doing, and Noguera's book, Excellence Through Equity, throughout each course to study organizational policies within larger educational systems and the many forces that influence practices that ultimately impact outcomes for students. In Course 633 candidates study organizational systems and the various influences that impact organizations while analyzing the system they currently work within through the Signature Project of unpacking their own school system. Through their own personal "deep dive" around bias and systemic racism in Course 635, and our text set around equity and bias in Course 634, candidates reflect upon their belief systems and understand how these impact students and families. Course Syllabi -
EDA 634
EDA 635
Finally, the program builds leadership perspective through learning activities that expose candidates to both the internal and external influences, relationships, resources, and opportunities that can engender and support the vision and mission of the school and district. Our coursework provides candidates a variety of learning opportunities that focus not only on the analysis of multiple programmatic strengths and needs in terms of vision and goal development within their own educational structures, but also leads candidates through critical inquiry of the greater educational community. Experiences that build an understanding around policies and practices that impact students helps develop a greater foundation that leads to deeper systems-thinking. Throughout the program, candidates learn about internal and external influences, such as in Course 631 when candidates delve into the importance of being a systems player and deepen their understanding of organizational structures. Additionally, candidates participate in a resource analysis in Course 633, which helps them understand the multiple influences and perspectives that school leaders must understand. In this same course, candidates participate in inquiry stations that take them through a study of both policies and practices that have promoted bias and discriminatory practices as well as policies and practices that promote equity inclusivity. During Course 636, candidates learn about educational law and the importance of grounding one's vision in equity and serving as an advocate for all students, especially when faced with the influence of political perspectives. In addition to faculty instructors, courses may bring in experts around course content, widening their perspectives through other's experiences. Our mission states that "Our emphasis on continuous improvement through a systems thinking lens provides candidates the skills and knowledge needed to tackle the complex challenges faced by schools today. We are committed to supporting and nurturing leaders who utilize relationships and their understanding of their community’s needs to transform their educational systems - systems that ensure equitable, inclusive outcomes for each and every student served. With a focus on instructional leadership embedded throughout our coursework, leaders develop a belief system around issues of justice, and a deep understanding of practices and policies that impact student learning." Course Syllabi -
EDA 631
EDA 633
EDA 636 
Program Standard Four: Equity, Diversity and Access
By design, the administrative services preparation program provides each candidate with an opportunity to understand and apply theories and principles of educational equity within the educational context, for the purposes of creating more socially just learning environments. The Contra Costa County Office of Education's PASC program is steeped in a philosophy centered around social justice. Throughout each course, the principles of equity are woven into readings, activities, discussions, and personal reflections, in order to provide opportunities for candidates to deepen their understanding around socially just learning environments. In Course 631, Shared Vision, candidates use an equity lens to examine multiple data sources, deepening their understanding of the importance of collaborative goals development that focuses on equitable and inclusive outcomes. Candidates learn how to utilize multiple data sources, such as observational data, assessment data, discipline data, engagement data, etc., to identify areas of need as well as strengths and assets of the community. This deep dive into data leads candidates to the identification of an equity gap and the understanding of programs and practices that close achievement gaps, especially for those populations that are vulnerable and historically underrepresented. These experiences also prepare them for the CalAPA. Resources such as the California English Learner Roadmap and other program texts help candidates to deepen their knowledge of practices successful in supporting effective instruction for all students. In Course 632, Instructional Leadership, candidates study the impact the instructional leader has on teaching and learning that ensures equitable outcomes. This course launches into the practice of critical conversations around issues of culture and race to guide, support, and monitor the teaching and learning that results in equitable and inclusive outcomes for students. Readings from Shattering Inequities and Excellence Through Equity are partnered with podcasts from Sharocky Hollie's CLR work around cultural proficiency, to deepen candidates' understanding of practices that support the teaching, learning, and engagement of marginalized populations in order to lead impactful work that serves vulnerable student groups. Course 633 leads candidates through study and analysis of practices to deepen their understanding of the complex interactions of educational systems from various contexts and the importance of being systems collaborators to maximize resources for equitable outcomes. Candidates learn to identify institutional biases and discriminatory practices that are found within educational systems, and they will study and reflect upon practices that address these inequities in order to achieve equitable learning opportunities for all students, with an emphasis on serving marginalized populations. Course 634 builds upon practices that foster family and community collaboration through trust building and facilitating relationships. Candidates will become familiar with community resources and services to support the greater needs of families and the community and to improve outcomes for all students in way that recognizes and builds upon the strengths and assets of the community. In Course 635, candidates grow their understanding of practices that break down institutional barriers and widen their perspectives around the change process within systems and organizations to successfully serve all students. Growing their knowledge around ethical uses of data that inform decisions within the cycle of continuous improvement, candidates begin to apply systems thinking theories around educational systems that have been proven to successfully serve all students. Candidates create a professional learning plan that supports their ongoing growth around issues of equity and integrity to serve all students in a just way. Throughout Course 636, candidates engage in a study on how education policy affects all parts of the educational system and is influenced by political, social, economic, legal and cultural factors. In order to become agents of change and equitable leaders, candidates will understand how educational law has been impacted by historical trends and issues that have perpetuated bias and discrimination and impacted outcomes for all students. Program graduates are well equipped to serve as leaders in any school community. Throughout the PASC program they develop skills for utilizing multiple systems of support to ensure that the learning communities they work within serve all students. Evidence of candidate achievement of outcomes is demonstrated during online PLC learning opportunities, during in-person class activities and is evidenced in Signature Project content.
PASC Program Vision and Mission
Course Syllabi. -
EDA 631
EDA 632
Through coursework and fieldwork, candidates:
(a) examine their personal attitudes related to issues of privilege and power in different domains including race, gender, language, sexual orientation, religion, ableness, and socio-economic status; Through course readings, PLC activities, in-person course activities and projects, candidates engage in multiple learning opportunities around privilege and power. Each course builds upon the previous in terms of developing candidates' cultural proficiency. As candidates examine their own biases, learn about educational history that includes policies that have exacerbated bias and racism, and throughout their own self examination, they create their own personal learning plan, which is presented at the end of EDA 635. Candidates reflect upon and grow their own belief system around leadership for justice through building their own knowledge and skill base related to white privilege, woven into each course content. Through the use of a "text set" model that incorporates multiple types of media, Courses EDA 632 and EDA 634 lead candidates through personal examinations of their biases, beliefs, and attitudes around various domains. Additionally, materials from Tolerance.org are utilized to support personal and group reflection, such as the "Test Yourself for Hidden Bias" survey that candidates take during Course 634. Candidates share their equitable leadership journey as a final project in EDA 636, Course Syllabi -
EDA 631 EDA 632 EDA 634 EDA 636
Link to Test Yourself for Hidden Bias
(b) learn ways to analyze, monitor, and address these issues at the individual and system level; Through course and fieldwork experiences, candidates learn how to develop systems and utilize critical inquiry practices and reflection to personally engage and to engage stakeholders in gathering, analyzing, and sharing multiple sources of data that assess and monitor program effectiveness/instructional strengths and needs based on issues of equitable outcomes for students, such as outlined in Course 631. In Course 633, candidates study and deepen understanding of how these efforts lead to the development of a school plan that is grounded in a common purpose and aligned to the school’s vision. Through candidate online PLC work, as well as during the in-person course activities, candidates study models of success and learn strategies that address issues of equity both at an individual level, as well as at a systems level. Course Syllabi -
EDA 631
EDA 633
(c) understand how explicit and implicit racial bias impacts instruction, classroom management, and other school policies; Breaking down institutional bias and the barriers that inhibit student success is embedded into each course and is a component of our program's mission. Candidates develop an in-depth understanding around racial bias and its impact on student outcomes through activities that are woven into each course, both in online PLC work and during in-person classwork. For example, during Course EDA 631 - Shared Vision, candidates study the importance of including multiple perspectives when collaborating around vision development in order to break down barriers that lead to discriminatory practices. Candidates look at multiple sources of data, including discipline practices, school climate data, and demographic data, to understand practices that support/do not support all students. During Course EDA 632 - Instructional Leadership, candidates focus on racial bias and practices that impede student success by reading articles such as Microagressions in the Classroom. and Candidates practice having courageous conversations with staff around issues of bias and learn how to collect data and evidence to support changes in teaching practice that result in improved outcomes for all students, especially historically underserved student groups. As candidates progress through their course of study, they understand policies and practices that have impacted discriminatory practices that create barriers to success for vulnerable and marginalized students. This occurs in all courses, as our focus on social justice is woven throughout each course. PASC Program Vision and Mission
Course Syllabi -
EDA 631
EDA 632
Article Microaggressions in the Classroom
(d) come to understand the role of the leader in creating equitable outcomes in schools. From candidates' first introductory course on visionary leadership, Course 631,the role of leadership around ensuring equitable and inclusive outcomes is emphasized. Candidates do a deep dive into MTSS and how to monitor growth through multiple data sources in order to ensure equitable outcomes. Our mission states, "We are committed to supporting and nurturing leaders who utilize relationships and their understanding of their community’s needs to transform their educational systems - systems that ensure equitable, inclusive outcomes for each and every student served. With a focus on instructional leadership embedded throughout our coursework, leaders develop a belief system around issues of justice, and a deep understanding of practices and policies that impact student learning." This focus on equitable and inclusive outcomes, as well as a study of the impact of bias and discrimination, occurs early on in our program and continues to be emphasized throughout each course. During Course 632, candidates participate in an activity around Ann Blakeney Clark's article focusing on "Strategic Staffing for Equitable Outcomes", found in the program textbook, Excellence Through Equity. Later in the same course, candidates take a closer look at some examples of schools who have made a significant impact on creating equitable outcomes in the readings "Focusing on Equity Propelled Us from Good to Great" and "Equity and Achievement in the Elementary School", both found in the program textbook, Excellence Through Equity. Candidates continue to follow their study of leading for equity in various other ways, such as during Course 634 when candidates study the CA English Learner Roadmap. In this course, candidates focus on Principle 1 to understand an "assets-based approach" in supporting communities. PASC Program Vision and Mission
Course Syllabi -
EDA 631
EDA 632
EDA 634
The program provides opportunities for candidates to learn:
a)how to identify, analyze and minimize personal bias Candidates participate in studies around implicit and explicit bias, both within the educational context and beyond. Through course readings, multi-media text sets, and activities such as Tolerance.org's Hidden Bias Survey and Elena Aguilar's Core Values activity in Course 632, candidates become deeply aware of their own biases. Our coursework requires candidates to do a personal "deep dive" around equity and bias, and each course layers in activities that build candidate's cultural competence. Candidate's participate in their own personal vision of equity throughout the course, deepening their understanding around their own biases so that they can effectively serve all students. In Course 636, candidates prepare a presentation around their own journey of equity, outlining their own cultural proficiency journey and culminating with practices and actions they will take to ensure equitable outcomes as a leader. Course Syllabi -
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Elena Aguilar's Core Values Activity Link to Test Yourself for Hidden Bias
b)how policies and historical practices create and maintain institutional bias Our course of study provides candidates the historical perspective of systems and practices that have perpetuated discriminatory practices and have created unequal learning opportunities, especially for students of color, English learners, and students with special needs. inhibit the success of students. In Course EDA 633, candidates understand and learn to identify institutional biases and discriminatory practices that are found within educational systems, and they study and learn about practices that address these inequities through an inquiry station model. This work is carried on throughout our courses, such as in Course EDA 635-Personal and Professional Ethics, where candidates participate in activities that entail personal reflection around their own development of leadership practices that break down institutional barriers for the achievement of equitable and inclusive outcomes for all students. Our program mission is to develop leaders for social justice. As leaders for equity, our participants learn about how to use data and evidence to lead conversations with staff and communities around institutional bias, privilege, and discriminatory practices and to lead with an assets-based lens. Course Syllabi -
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c)how leaders can address and monitor institutional-level inequity.
As candidates deepen their understanding of the change process within systems and organizations, they will understand the relationship between ethical uses of data that inform decisions within the cycle of continuous improvement and those decisions leading to educational systems that successfully serve all students. This focus begins in our first course, Course 631 - Shared Vision. In this course candidates go through several types of data analysis such as the FIA as part of their MTSS deep dive. Candidates will deepen their understanding of the change process within systems and organizations throughout our program and become knowledgeable of how to engage in a cycle of improvement. In Course 636 - Leadership Perspectives, the course focuses on educational policy and how all facets of the educational system are influenced by political, social, economic, legal and cultural factors. Candidates will understand these relationships and how impactful the intersection of these influences is upon ensuring that outcomes for students are equitable. Course Syllabi -
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The program prepares candidates to improve schooling for all students with an emphasis on vulnerable and historically underserved students by examining teaching, learning, student engagement, student discipline, school culture, family involvement, and other programmatic supports in the school for the purposes of providing effective instruction and equitable access for all students. Throughout our coursework, the knowledge and skills needed to improve educational outcomes for all students is at the forefront. Whether through our teaching and learning Throughout Course EDA631 we emphasize the ethical use of multiple data sources to create a shared vision of equity. Participants do a deep dive into three years of data from their school site and examine the supports and strengths, as well as equity gaps occurring. Throughout this process participants focus on data around student groups, particularly those populations who are vulnerable and historically underrepresented, including English Learner populations and students with special needs. Candidates learn how to collaborate with school communities to develop a common goal of support for all students. Our coursework utilizing the California English Learner Roadmap focuses on the roadmap's core principles, including Principle #1, Assets Oriented and Needs Responsive Schools. We delve into the EL Roadmap's latest toolkit for administrators (California Together) and examine successful practices that are inclusive and equitable. This work continues in Course EDA 632, where participants take their equity gap plan to a deeper level and drill down into strategies and supports that have successfully improved achievement for all students. Participants put instructional leadership into practice by participating in professional development opportunities, leading study of practices that close the achievement gap, and preparing for the CalAPA. Candidates participate in classroom observations, growing their understanding of practices and programs that support all students, especially those who are historically underserved. This preparation for the CalAPA prepares candidates to further their vision of leading for equitable outcomes that support all students. nted schools and communities By participating in an in depth study of school systems and practices that have contributed to bias and discrimination of particular student groups in Course EDA 633, candidates develop an understanding of how to be a change agent, especially in terms of systems and policies that support the achievement of historically underserved students, such as students with special needs. Through the use of inquiry stations, candidates explore policies/practices, such as IDEA, to deepen their historical of practices that address systemic inequities. This continues into Course EDA 634, where candidates focus on community and family involvement and how to best support the needs of the community. Through participation in an equity, bias, privilege text set, candidates participate in a series of activities that deepen their awareness of privilege and bias. Candidates focus on equity gaps, such as those of English learners and students with special needs, as well as strengthening their focus on the assets of the community. Throughout Courses EDA 635 and EDA 636 our candidates dovetail their own personal biases and reflect upon practices and policies that support all students. A history of education law takes candidates through our nation's history of education, studying various experiences, such as special education law, history of schooling for African American students, etc. Finally, in Course EDA 637 our students put these theories into practice through field experiences within diverse environments, deepening their understanding of practices that successfully serve all students. (Course 634), or when learning how to have difficult conversations around instructional practices that support or do not support all students (Course 632), candidates learn and grow their skills around practices that impact equitable and inclusive outcomes for all students. Course Syllabi -
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The program ensures candidates understand pedagogical approaches that recognize the importance of building on students' strengths and assets as a foundation for supporting all students, especially historically underserved students including English learners and students with special needs. Our assets building philosophy is emphasized throughout coursework that supports candidates with understanding and developing the knowledge and skills needed for successful leadership. Two of our program texts, The Leadership Challenge and Rethinking Teacher Supervision and Evaluation, focus on the interpersonal relationships needed to build a learning community that impacts all students. In addition to utilizing an assets building approach with students, our program also emphasizes the importance of asset building practices with families and with staff in order to effectively lead for equity, Course 634. Course Syllabus -
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Program Standard Five: Role of Schooling in a Democratic Society
By design, the administrative services preparation program provides each candidate with an opportunity to critically examine the principles of democratic education and the responsibilities of citizenship. Contra Costa County Office of Education's PASC program is grounded in the development of the essential behaviors that leaders employ and supports candidates’ understanding of the importance of creating an environment of trust, modeling ethics and integrity to inspire, and uniting communities around a common goal of equity. These behaviors are emphasized in our study of The Leadership Challenge, which focuses on the principles and responsibilities of a democratic system. Our additional core text, Excellence Through Equity, is also an integral part of each course, supporting the critical thinking and inquiry skills of equity-minded candidates. The opportunity to critically examine the principles of education within a democratic society is most apparent throughout our online PLC sessions. To deepen their understanding of civic responsibility, candidates work through scenarios and problem solve issues to examine our educational systems from multiple perspectives. Course Syllabi showing course texts and associated activities.
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This includes the moral imperative to provide all students with the best possible education. Our mission states that "we are committed to supporting and nurturing leaders who utilize relationships and their understanding of their community’s needs to transform their educational systems - systems that ensure equitable, inclusive outcomes for each and every student served." This is evidenced throughout our PLC online coursework, beginning with our very first course, EDA 631, which focuses on utilizing data to uncover strengths and gaps in order to develop a community vision of equitable outcomes for all students. In Course EDA 632, selected readings from Shattering Inequities illustrate the importance of a leader's commitment to ensuring that all students are provided access to high level learning opportunities. As candidates move through the program, each course deepens candidates' belief systems around the commitment to optimizing the educational system for all students. In course EDA 635, candidates participate in activities focused on policies and practices that break down institutional barriers for the achievement of equitable and inclusive outcomes for all students. In EDA 636, Leadership Perspectives: External Context and Policy, candidates participate in a study of educational law coupled with the historical background of issues and trends in education in order to develop a greater understanding of policies and legal issues that impact educational systems so that they may learn how to disrupt barriers to equitable outcomes for all students. Our ongoing PLC work is rich with opportunities for candidates to collaborate with colleagues from diverse backgrounds as they participate in scenario based activities that demand dialogue and analysis of situations that lead to a deepened understanding of leading within a democratic system. as well as in each and every in-person learning experience throughout our program. Each program text was chosen specifically for not only its core content, but also to support leaders in building a vision around equitable outcomes for all students. PASC Program Vision and Mission
Course Syllabi showing course activities and readings
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The program prepares each candidate to understand the role of the school in preparing K-12 students to actively and productively engage in civic responsibility and to identify and critically analyze the variety of ideas and forces in society that contribute to (or constrain) a democratic society. Our program is dedicated to preparing leaders to ensure equitable outcomes for all students, TK-12. This includes respecting the goals and aspirations of families and understanding the multiple contexts that impact community engagement. Throughout our program, Within each course, candidates learn various problem solving and facilitation strategies and practices, including their active involvement in cycles of inquiry. Throughout each course, candidates study the tenets of MTSS, Multi-Tiered Systems of Support, which helps them understand the responsibility to support all aspects of their students' needs. More specifically, in Course 633, candidates explore the various interrelationships that exist across/within school systems and understand how to identify, align, and optimize these resources for staff and student health, safety, academic learning, and well-being. The Signature Project of this course has candidates participate in a “systems analysis” by “unpacking” their school system from federal to state to county to local resources in order to understand and analyze the various societal influences across school systems. Candidates participate in activities and projects throughout the program that deepen their knowledge around practices that prepare our K-12 students to productively engage in their civic responsibilities. For example, in EDA 632, candidates are involved in topic specific modules on listening and giving feedback, which incorporate tenets of Restorative Justice and deepen their knowledge around instructional strategies and practices that build community within a democratic society. In EDA 634, candidates engage in a multi-media text set that focuses on bias, white privilege, and justice and involves dialogue from multiple perspectives that contribute to our democratic system. Throughout EDA 636, candidates build their understanding of the political and social components of educational policy within a democratic society through readings, field experiences such as attending a school board meeting, and class projects. Additionally, throughout the program candidates are involved in scenario-based activities in their PLCs that tap into ethical decision making and deepen their understanding around the impact leaders have on ensuring equitable practices, especially when political forces are at play.   Course Syllabi showing the ongoing study of
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The program includes opportunities for candidates to learn how historical and philosophical influences, state and federal policy decisions, and prevailing educational practices impact schooling. Our candidates learn about educational policies and legal practices that influence education, both past and present, to best envision an equitable educational future. Course 633 has candidates studying practices from a local perspective, researching the policies of their own LEA, while studying a broader history through a state and local perspective of educational policy. Additionally candidates participate in Inquiry Stations in order to study historical policies and practices that have impacted educational experiences for students. Course EDA 636 focuses on education policy, and how all facets of the educational system are influenced by political, social, economic, legal and cultural factors. Candidates will understand these relationships and how impactful the intersection of these influences are to ensuring that outcomes for students are equitable and inclusive as they engage in selected readings, podcasts, and activities that demand critical analysis of political and social forces relative to our educational systems. Course Syllabus -
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In addition, the program prepares administrators to establish civility through an organizational culture that promotes constructive problem solving, conflict resolution strategies, and application of ethical behaviors. Through our online PLC work, as well as through our in-person coursework, candidates learn a variety of strategies for program development, facilitation practices, and problem solving. These are approached from multiple angles, depending on the course content, and support the understanding of democratic education. Each course builds historical understanding into the content, which is coupled with foundational content around leadership skills and how this background is important in developing multiple perspectives for leading in the future. For example, in Course EDA 632, Instructional Leadership, candidates learn about employment and supervisory practices within the parameters of unions and employment law. They study and practice how to give feedback and how to engage in courageous conversations that break down barriers and foster positive change. Additionally, during Course EDA 634, candidates learn conflict resolution skills both from a student climate perspective as well as from the adult collaboration perspective. In Course EDA 635 is titled Personal and Professional Ethics for Leadership. In this course, candidates examine their belief systems and grow their own personal leadership capacity in order to tackle complex challenges facing schools today. Through research, reflection, and goal setting. candidates participate in a series of scenario activities to deepen their problem solving skills. Guest speakers bring experiences and additional learning opportunities to many courses around topics such as collective bargaining, working with labor unions, and compliance. All of our courses and readings have an underlying focus around ethical leadership, which is at the core of our mission. Course Syllabi -
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Category 2 - Curriculum
Program Standard Six: Preparing Candidates to Master the Administrator Performance Expectations (CAPEs)
The California Administrator Performance Expectations describe the set of professional knowledge, skills and abilities expected of a beginning level practitioner in order to effectively lead a school community in educating and supporting all students in meeting the state-adopted academic standards.
The California Administrator Performance Assessment (CalAPA) is an assessment designed to ensure preliminary credential candidates have demonstrated satisfactory knowledge and understanding of the California Administrator Performance Expectations.
The program’s organized coursework and clinical practice provide multiple opportunities for candidates to learn, apply, and reflect on each California Administrator Performance Expectation (CAPE). As candidates progress through the program, pedagogical and andragogical assignments are increasingly complex and challenging. The Contra Costa County Office of Education's PASC program is grounded in the CAPEs. Candidates work through a developmentally progressive course of study that leads from theory to practical application. Each course builds upon the previous course content, with key principles woven into each course: equity and bias, relationships and trust, improvement science, systems thinking, and shared purpose and vision. Adult learning theory and andragogical approaches are at the core of course development, taking into account the varying environments and thus, differing contexts within which our candidates work. CAPE Course Alignment
Narrative Description of Research Base

Course Syllabi
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The scope of the pedagogical and andragogical assignments (a) address the CAPE as they apply to the credential Each course prepares candidates for acquisition of the CAPEs through hands-on activities, collaborative projects, personal reflection, and personalized learning opportunities. Each activity builds an understanding and helps with the ongoing development of a belief system that is foundational to ensuring successful outcomes for all students. CAPE Course Alignment
Course Syllabi showing course descriptions and outcomes
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and (b) prepares the candidate for the California Administrator Performance Assessment (CalAPA) and other program-based assessments. All courses provide content that prepares our candidates for the CalAPA. Course 631 focuses on analyzing multiple data sources in order to develop a shared vision. This introductory course is the beginning preparation for all three CalAPA cycles, and most specifically for preparation for Cycle 1 when candidates develop an equity plan to address a problem of practice. As candidates make their way through Course 632 - Instructional Leadership, they build skills for Cycle 1 and prepare themselves for Cycle 2. Our online PLC work models the learning communities that candidates facilitate for Cycle 2. Coursework from Course 632 - Instructional Leadership also focuses on supervision and the observation cycle and prepares candidates to complete Cycle 3. Our course text, Rethinking Teacher Supervision and Evaluation, leads candidates through models of supervision and strategies for providing feedback, both which address the outcomes of Cycles 2, 3. Each of the additional courses builds upon the previous, ultimately preparing all candidates to successfully complete Cycles 1 - 3. Our online PLC work provides opportunities to practice the skills needed for successful completion of all three CalAPA cycles. Our fieldwork course, Course 637, supports candidate preparation for the three CalAPA cycles through coursework that focuses on the elements of the CalAPA and through practical leadership experiences documented in the Fieldwork Experience Log. Course Sequence and Sessions

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Fieldwork Experience Log
As candidates progress through the curriculum, faculty and other qualified supervisors assess candidates’ performance in relation to the CAPE and provide formative and timely performance feedback regarding candidates’ progress toward mastering the CAPE. Each course is taught by experienced leaders who bring significant expertise around the area of study and provide ongoing and timely feedback to candidates throughout the course in order to grow the knowledge and skills needed in that area of focus. For program continuity in both philosophical and practical content, faculty members attend at least three faculty meetings each year and actively facilitate portions of the Leadership Learning Seminar. Faculty calibrate rubrics for the Signature Projects of each course so that all staff maintain high standards. Faculty fieldwork supervisors also serve as critical friends who provide necessary feedback and input into the candidate's performance. All faculty are well versed in the CAPEs, which serve as the guidepost for leadership readiness. Course Sequence and Sessions
Faculty Advisor Responsibilities
Faculty Job Description Annotated List of Data Sources showing ongoing feedback cycles  Assessment Roles and Responsibilities
Category 3 - Field Experiences in the Program
Program Standard Seven: Nature of Field Experiences

In the administrative services preparation program, candidates participate in practical field experiences that are designed to facilitate the application of theoretical concepts in authentic settings. Throughout the program, candidates work with their faculty advisors to participate in experiences within their school district, as well as in surrounding schools in order to gain a broad perspective of socioeconomic and cultural diversity. Sessions for course EDA 637 - Equity Driven Educational Opportunities, are spread across the 11-month program so that candidates have opportunities to obtain leadership experiences and then reflect upon their practices with faculty, thus ensuring that fieldwork experiences are in line with the acquisition of each of the CAPEs. Fieldwork advisors work with candidates, ensuring that their program and fieldwork experiences do not just occur at their own school site, but also occur in schools with diverse student populations and achievement gaps. A Fieldwork Experience Log is kept throughout the program and is used to document and analyze fieldwork experiences. Additionally, candidates participate in a more extensive fieldwork project. Each candidate identifies, through an in-depth data analysis, a problem of practice. They then participate in a cycle of inquiry to address inequities identified. With the guidance of their advisor and site supervisor, participants follow the “investigate, plan, act, and reflect” process and apply the theoretical concepts of improvement science within an authentic educational setting. The mission of our PASC program focuses on social justice and therefore students not only participate in course activities that build a greater understanding of institutional barriers that have created inequity, such as in course EDA 635, but they also do extensive work around practices that break down barriers and examine those strategies that positively impact all students, especially our most vulnerable student populations. In each course students are assigned a new PLC with whom they work throughout the course. These professional learning communities are carefully created by PASC faculty members to ensure that participants work with colleagues from a varied range of school populations, ensuring additional understanding around cultural and socioeconomic diversity. Group projects and collaboration within the PLCs helps candidates to better understand the diversity of our county and helps prepare our candidates to lead across all populations. Program Handbook- Fieldwork Projects ,
Course Sequence and Sessions
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Fieldwork Experience Log
Each candidate is introduced to the major duties and responsibilities authorized by the administrative services credential as articulated in the Performance Expectations.  The work-embedded fieldwork experiences in which our candidates engage provide them the opportunity to grow their leadership skills with the support of a faculty advisor and experience the leadership actions identified in the CAPEs. Fieldwork experiences occur with leaders from a variety of settings so that candidates deepen their understanding of various cultures and populations. Some examples of how the CAPEs are addressed throughout the program in terms of field experiences are as follows: CAPE 1: Candidates will analyze multiple data sources within their district and/or work place and identify a problem of practice. Candidates will participate in a cycle of inquiry and utilize the investigate, plan, act, reflect process. CAPE 2: Once a problem of practice has been identified, candidates will work with a PLC to provide learning opportunities to address the problem of practice. Candidates will facilitate a Professional Learning Community meeting, focusing on practices that address the identified problem of practice. CAPE 3: Through a deepening understanding of fiscal responsibilities, candidates will develop a budget. This will occur after participating in a site meeting such as School Site Council, where a budget is developed or reviewed. CAPE 4: Candidates will work with their site supervisor to develop a Community Involvement Plan, based on a needs assessment. CAPE 5: Candidates will research and review their organization's teacher evaluation procedures. Candidates will participate in a teacher observation cycle with a deepened understanding of compliance and regulations. CAPE 6: Candidates will utilize strategies that support collaboration amongst staff and community members in order to best leverage the improvement practices they have identified to support the success of all students. They will attend a school board meeting. Program Handbook Fieldwork -
Fieldwork Experience Roles and Responsibilities
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Fieldwork Experience Log
CAPES Course Alignment
Field experiences include a variety of diverse and realistic settings both in the day-to-day functions of administrators and in long-term policy design and implementation. The purpose of participation in fieldwork experiences is to provide hands-on, practical leadership experiences that address all of the CAPEs. Candidates experience